Black Sororities Have Stood At The Forefront Of Black Achievement For More Than A Century

Even today, the core mission of Black sororities remains civic engagement and racial justice.

All members of sororities and fraternities may donate to social causes or volunteer as part of satisfying school community service requirements. A few make it their main focus.

But across the board, Black sororities emphasize consequential and sustained community service, while their members are students and also once they’ve graduated from college. This is also true of the few white women who have joined Black sororities over the years.

[Insight, in your inbox each day.
You can get it with The Conversation’s email newsletter.]

Like with biological families where members remain in the family no matter what, for Black women, sorority affiliation usually becomes a permanent part of their identity and an enduring source of pride and support.

Many members of Black sororities remain active and engaged for the rest of their lives. They join local chapters, changing their affiliation whenever they move. Through this practice, their bond of sisterhood remains intact.

When I moved to North Texas, for example, local sorority members reached out to me. They helped me acclimate and make connections so that I immediately felt welcome. I also remain engaged with the sorority chapter I joined at Longwood by mentoring students, donating to scholarship funds and through other means.

As Harris made clear in her speech, she believes she stands on the shoulders of phenomenal women who, years after they blazed trails, taught today’s Black women how to be persistent in creating change that benefits our communities, and how to teach others to follow in our footsteps.

They taught us to lift as we climb.The Conversation

____

Tamara L. Brown, Executive Dean and Professor of Psychology, University of North Texas

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Source link